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Thread: Natural products for your garden: Powdery Mildew & Spider Mites

  1. #11
    What if I was to buy the hydrogen peroxide at the dollar store and put it in the freezer to freeze the water. My thinking is the peroxide doesn't freeze and you can then pour out the peroxide without the water ?
    King of the Caprines, Boss of the Bovids.

  2. #12
    For mite eradication, I spot spray w iso alcohol. I dilute it some but can not exactly tell you how much. This kills em buggers on the spot.

    For determining percentages of percents, I know what I don't know real well (always a "C" math student) so I take a few minutes and do some open-minded research to review precisely how this is determined. Nobody likes being incorrect, but hey who gives a shit.. this is the inet. I just want the truth.

    DailyToker you are one creative cat... you're not in A2 are you?
    but I still stand by my observation and am unswayed by your determination. when understanding percentages of percents you do not simply find the difference between the two. see above formula. again, a 100% increase of 3% is 6%, so try your deduction from that point.

    please accept my apology if I'm incorrect, but pay-up if I'm right.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by CgOrganic View Post
    What if I was to buy the hydrogen peroxide at the dollar store and put it in the freezer to freeze the water. My thinking is the peroxide doesn't freeze and you can then pour out the peroxide without the water ?
    The stuff at the dollar store or any pharmacy, will freeze in the freezer because the percentage of H202 is so low. Storing food grade 35% H202 in the freezer is a good idea as it will prolong its life. I believe it freezes somewhere around negative 30 to 40 degrees.

    A side note though, it is actually cheaper to buy pharmacy grade at a pharmacy rather than the dollar store. Kroger pharmacy has it at $.80 for a decent sized bottle. The dollar store has almost half the size bottles for $1.
    "Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense." - Buddha

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by abeam-pm View Post
    For mite eradication, I spot spray w iso alcohol. I dilute it some but can not exactly tell you how much. This kills em buggers on the spot.

    For determining percentages of percents, I know what I don't know real well (always a "C" math student) so I take a few minutes and do some open-minded research to review precisely how this is determined. Nobody likes being incorrect, but hey who gives a shit.. this is the inet. I just want the truth.

    DailyToker you are one creative cat... you're not in A2 are you?
    but I still stand by my observation and am unswayed by your determination. when understanding percentages of percents you do not simply find the difference between the two. see above formula. again, a 100% increase of 3% is 6%, so try your deduction from that point.

    please accept my apology if I'm incorrect, but pay-up if I'm right.
    Do you spot spray with the isopropyl alcohol in the flower room? That would be a little on the sketchy side to me as any mist getting on the bud may damage the trichomes and or bud. Vegging plants are probably ok though, although I still tend to stay away from alcohol around any plant life.

    I've also used neem oil for minor mite infestations. (All I've really had are minor infestations) And it seems to work pretty good, usually destroying them within 1-2 treatments. The plants love the neem mix, so hip hip hooray for that.

    The percentage difference between 64.24% and 74.24% - Math Central
    <-- This will clear up how to determine percent differences of percentages.
    Showing that you do simply, find the difference between the two. I see the point you are trying to make and fully understand your side of a 100% increase of 3% being 6%. Although incorrect in these circumstances we have been talking about, I understand it and in some equations it is true. Just not this one. "In mathematics, a percentage is a number or ratio as a fraction of 100."

    Sometimes due to inconsistent usage, it is not always clear from the context what a percentage is relative to. When speaking of a "10% rise" or a "10% fall" in a quantity, the usual interpretation is that this is relative to the initial value of that quantity. For example, if an item is initially priced at $200 and the price rises 10% (an increase of $20), the new price will be $220. Note that this final price is 110% of the initial price (100% + 10% = 110%). This is the case for the type of formula you are using. It stands correct when figuring totals such as this. However when two percentages are the equation, it is as simple as subtraction or addition.

    No need for an apology, but I will write you down for owing 1 beer.

    Yes I am in the A2 (area).

    Oh and I have to.... YOU WANT THE TRUTH!?!? YOU CAN'T HANDLE THE TRUTH!!!!

    This thread actually prompted me to add the below quote into my signature. Even after this post right here, I still hope people call B.S.
    and do their own research (if they care) to find the correct answer. Whether it be mine, yours, theirs or someone else's. Believe nothing from no one.
    "Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense." - Buddha

  5. #15
    Our explanations are for two different questions.
    I agree that 35-3=32. :-)

    Perhaps I didn't make it clear initially: 1066% is the percentage of increase to arrive at the 35% solution based on the initial amount of the 3% solution. I am not pointing out just the increase of % points, it's the percentage of increase from the original amount.

    Is this a semantics thing? Does the context make the difference, so we can pretend like we're both correct? My panoptical approach to this matter may merit a coffee.

  6. #16
    I agree completely. Our explanations are for two different questions. Mine is for the question of what is the percentage difference between 3% and 35%. Your's isn't. lol.

    If you agree that 35-3=32 then you agree that the answer to the question of what is the percentage difference between 3% and 35% is 32%.
    You are trying to find the percentage difference between 3% and 35% not 35% and 100%. Just forget 100% even exists for this question.

    The context makes the difference because that is why we use math. lol. Every mathematical question has the appropriate equation given the context of the question. This is why we have so many different mathematical subject areas. Each one has its place in each question.

    At this point I don't even know what the hell we're talking about or what it has to do with mites.
    So I'm stepping out of this bad boy because none of this makes sense anymore. lol.

    I'm too tired and got to get to my second job.
    "Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense." - Buddha

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to DailyToker For This Useful Post:

    abeam-pm (03-17-2013)

  8. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by DailyToker View Post
    Do you spot spray with the isopropyl alcohol in the flower room? That would be a little on the sketchy side to me as any mist getting on the bud may damage the trichomes and or bud. Vegging plants are probably ok though, although I still tend to stay away from alcohol around any plant life. ........
    Yah, that alcohol kills the bugs, but is harmful to the trichs in flower.
    It also strips the protective wax off the leaves as well, leaving them vulnerable to other critters that may wander by.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Frank R For This Useful Post:

    DailyToker (03-11-2013)

  10. #18
    Has anyone tried asprin in water? I havent researched it but read quickly on a site that it works well for pests or mildews and molds.
    "Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense." - Buddha

  11. #19
    Haven't tried it yet but I used to put aspirin in the water for fresh flowers to keep bacteria at bay and it worked well. Haven't heard of using on your plants before, interesting. Willow bark is used as root started and has acetylsalicylic acid in it like aspirin. I wonder how it would affect the ladies.

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